vintageanchorbooks:

What We See When We Read”, in cute animated form!

A whole bunch of characters!

"There is nothing more political than literature. Reading is the real Revolution."

Orlando Luis Pardo Lazo, editor of Cuba in Splinters: Eleven Stories from the New Cuba, on the PEN Ten (via orbooks)

I knew I was doing something important!

myimaginarybrooklyn:

muspeccoll:

Lynd Ward’s sinister wood engravings for Madman’s Drum, 1930

Lynd Ward produced wordless graphic novels in the 1920s and 1930s, creating stories made up entirely of illustrations.  Although the genre was pioneered by Frans Masereel, Ward is perhaps the most influential of the early wordless novelists.  Art Spiegelman, Will Eisner, Allen Ginsberg and many others have cited him as an inspiration in their own work.

Ward worked primarily in wood engraving, which allowed for a refined line and detail.  These images are from Madman’s Drum, the story of a slave trader, an African drum, and a devastating family curse.

Ward, Lynd, 1905-1985.  Madman’s drum, a novel in woodcuts by Lynd Ward. New York, J. Cape, H. Smith [c1930]. MERLIN catalog record

- Kelli Hansen

(via powells)

My weekend is ending at Barred Owl Retreat. While here, I revised an entire novel manuscript and wrote a new short story. The short story came out of nowhere! Also, took some great walks, have wonderful company and wine, and a comfy bed. More pictures soon, particularly of the two white ducks who are obviously so in love with each other.

Besides single rooms for retreats, the Barred Owl offers space for writing workshops and, of course, writing workshops. The rooms are reasonable and beautiful. Can’t believe how much I got done!

We Are Now Seeking: Non-Fiction Essays, Journalistic Scoops, Interviews, and Book Reviews

thatlitsite:

Interested in having your article, personal essay, interview with an author or publisher, or book review published? Send your work to ThatLitSiteSubmissions@gmail.com as a doc file and, at the very least, we’ll read your written work.

Label the submission appropriately by putting Article / Essay / Interview / Review in the headline of the e-mail.

We’ll get back to you within business one week if we’re interested in publishing your piece.

Interesting.

tastefullyoffensive:

Name Improvements for Everyday Stuff [x]

Previously: Crazy Ideas That Are Borderline Genius

I am no longer addicted to french fries. I now have a jones for potato sticks.

(via nineinchnihils)

"The federal government will make $184 billion in profits from student loan debt over the next decade."

— ‘The Hi-Tech Mess of Higher Education' via New York Review of Books (via publicsq)

(via teachingliteracy)

nevver:

How to

"Tedium has never been this topless."

nevver:

How to

"Tedium has never been this topless."

(via braiker)

To George Orwell:

                  You were right, you were right, you were right.”

I’ll Pound Ya!

The article, “Is Poetry Dead? Not if 45 Official Laureates Are Any Indication" starts off with with a quote from Ezra Pound: "Literature is news that stays news."

The article is okay. It steers clear from some of the juicy controversy. But! I wanted to say, though he was a fascist, I love so many things Pound said. Here are some Poundisms:

"Man reading should be man intensely alive. The book should be a ball of light in one’s hand.”

"Rhythm must have meaning."

“The only thing one can give an artist is leisure in which to work. To give an artist leisure is actually to take part in his creation.” (this is why I’m going here this weekend)

And this this gorgeous poem:

In a Station of the Metro
 
The apparition of these faces in the crowd;    
Petals on a wet, black bough.

Everyone shares things from Buzzfeed so I don’t feel that I have to, but I love this!

"The land of Bafflement is strange and spooky, and, as it turns out, it’s where writers live much of the time. It is full of mystery, and howling wolves. Sometimes it’s terrifying, all that inchoate reaching, all that heartfelt darkness… . For all the same reasons it unnerves you, it’s a bounteous land."

— Maud Casey, novelist, in The American Scholar.

teachingliteracy:

explore-blog:
Bohemians: A Graphic History – some of today’s most exciting comic artists tell the stories of some of history’s greatest creative mavericks, including Walt Whitman, Oscar Wilde, Josephine Baker, Henry Miller, Gertrude Stein, Thelonious Monk, and more.

Neat-o!

teachingliteracy:

explore-blog:

Bohemians: A Graphic History – some of today’s most exciting comic artists tell the stories of some of history’s greatest creative mavericks, including Walt Whitman, Oscar Wilde, Josephine Baker, Henry Miller, Gertrude Stein, Thelonious Monk, and more.

Neat-o!

(Source: explore-blog)

Since I started teaching my daughters piano, I’ve been playing more piano. This means more cussing from me every time I miss a note (“why in the f*** would I play E flat? It’s in F,” or “$#!&, $#!&, $#!&!” or “Motherf***** god**mn sonuva.” It’s all in good fun. What’s playing the piano if you can’t cuss along with the music? When I was younger and still smoked, I’d have a Camel hanging from my lips and dropping ashes on the peeling ivory of the ancient baby grand in our family house. And I’d cuss like a drunken whore. Not that I knew any drunken whores, but I imagine that’s how they talked. Good times, right?) and lots of wrists pain. So, now I’m playing Clementi’s “Sonatina op 36 no 3,” which I’ve never played before. It’s really pretty!